Surface Integrity of Die Material in High Speed Hard Machining, Part 2: Microhardness Variations and Residual Stresses Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • The main objective of this paper is to investigate the quality and integrity of the surface produced during high speed hard machining (HSHM) of D2 tool steel in its hardened state (60–62 HRc). Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools are used in this study. The results obtained from the micro-graphical analysis of the surface produced are presented in Part 1 of this paper. In Part 2 micro-hardness and residual stress analyses are presented. Microhardness measurements are conducted beneath the machined surface. X-ray diffraction analysis is performed to obtain the residual stress distribution beneath the surface. Analytically, a 3-D thermo-elasto-plastic finite element model is developed to predict the residual stresses induced in the workpiece surface. In the model the cutting zone is specified based on the tool condition (i.e., sharp or worn). The finite element analysis demonstrates the significant effect of the heat generated during cutting on the residual stress distribution. The results illustrate the possibility of minimizing the high tensile residual stresses produced in the workpiece surface, by selecting the appropriate depth of cut. A good correlation between the analytical and predicted residual stress is obtained. [S1087-1357(00)00804-2]

publication date

  • November 1, 2000