Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Parotid Gland: A Case Report. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • INTRODUCTION: Solitary fibrous tumor is a rare, mesenchymal neoplasm that has been reported in numerous sites. Occurrence in the parotid gland is exceedingly rare. CASE REPORT: A 53-year-old man with a 2 cm solitary fibrous tumor of the left parotid gland, that was observed clinically and operatively and thought to be a neoplasm arising from Stensen's duct, is described. A pre-operative CT scan demonstrated a well-circumscribed, solid, avidly-enhancing nodule superficial to the masseter muscle, deep to the platysma, and intimately associated with the parotid duct. Multiple fine needle aspirations yielded scant fibrous tissue and lymphocytes. A superficial parotidectomy was performed. The histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were in keeping with solitary fibrous tumor, fibrous variant, with a low mitotic rate and a peripherally-entrapped parotid duct surrounded by abundant periductal collagen and lymphocytes. At a 2-year follow up, there was no evidence of tumor recurrence or metastasis. CONCLUSION: Solitary fibrous tumor should be suspected in the context of a slow-growing, well-circumscribed, solid, avidly-enhancing nodule of the parotid gland. Grossly intimate association with the parotid duct may reflect peripheral entrapment. Fine needle aspirations that predominantly yield collagen without spindle cell clusters should be correlated with clinical and radiological findings, as it is expected in tumor sampling of the fibrous variant. Although solitary fibrous tumor of the parotid gland usually exhibits benign behavior, it is best regarded as potentially malignant. Patient management and follow-up should be tailored to each individual and clinicopathological risk assessment of the recurrent/metastatic potential.

publication date

  • September 2015