Effects of Self-Selected Exercise on Strength in Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease Subtypes Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • Abstract Background: Preliminary studies have supported the utility of exercise as a treatment for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) patients. Despite being the most common inherited neuropathy, there remains a paucity of guidelines for CMT management. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on 297 CMT patients. Self-reported exercise and strength results from standardized dynamometer testing were obtained from adult patients’ first visits. Values were converted and analyzed based on previously reported age- and sex-matched normative values. Results: Participants with CMT2 had greater strength values than those with CMT1 in hand grip, elbow flexion, and dorsiflexion (p<0.05). Participants with CMT1 and CMT2 who exercised were statistically significantly stronger in elbow flexion and dorsiflexion than those who did not exercise. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that self-directed exercise is associated with greater strength in CMT patients of both CMT1 and CMT2 subtypes. Self-directed exercise may be a convenient, sustainable, and effective method of improving strength and decreasing disability in this population. Future research should explore the type of exercise prescription that best addresses the needs of the CMT population.

publication date

  • September 2017