Application Of The American College Of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Recommendations And a Risk Stratification Score (OESIL) For Patients With Syncope Admitted From The Emergency Department. Academic Article uri icon

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abstract

  • AIMS: The goals of this study were to apply the 2001 ACEP recommendations for admission to hospital after a syncopal event and to validate the OESIL risk stratification score, in patients with syncope admitted to a general internal medicine ward. METHODS: A retrospective study applied the 2001 ACEP recommendations and OESIL score to all the patients admitted from the emergency department to a general internal medicine ward with a diagnosis of syncope during a 12-month period. The patients were classified as meeting criteria for 2001 ACEP class B or C recommendations and OESIL score 0-1 (low-risk for a major cardiac event) or 2-4 (high-risk for a major cardiac event). The sensitivity and specificity of each group for predicting high-risk patients was calculated. RESULTS: After applying the 2001 ACEP recommendations to our population, 25% (19 patients) were classified as level B, whereas 68% of the patients were classified as Level C. Sensitivity for ACEP level B recommendations was 100% and specificity was 81%. The ACEP level C recommendations also had 100% sensitivity but markedly reduced specificity at 26%. An OESIL score of 0-1 points was calculated for 30.6% of the population, identifying them as low-risk. An OESIL score of 2-4 points was documented in the remaining 69.4% with a mortality risk of 20 % /year. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion (30%) of patients presenting with syncope to a tertiary care University Hospital emergency department and admitted to an Internal Medicine ward were retrospectively classified as low-risk and could have potentially been managed as outpatients. Implementing current guidelines and clinical pathways for the management of syncope may improve this approach.

publication date

  • September 2011